60 Years Ago the Supreme Court Told Schools to Desegregate. Here’s How Fast We’re Backsliding. —By Lauren Williams, Brett Brownell, and Mark Murrmann| Sat May 17, 2014 9:12 AM EDT1

Just Sayin'

A 1973 Charlotte, N.C., first grade class that was integrated through a school busing program. 

Sixty years ago, the Supreme Court ruled that segregation in schools was unconstitutional. The changes required by Brown v. Board of Education decision were not immediate, but they were profound and lasting. Today, schools in the South are the least segregated for black students in the nation.

Of course, that doesn’t tell the whole story. In honor of the Brown anniversary, UCLA’s Civil Rights Project released a report that analyzes the progress of desegregation since 1954. According to the report, starting in the 1980s, schools began to ditch integration efforts and shift focus to universal education standards as a way to level the playing field for students in unequal schools. In 1991, when the Supreme Court ruled that school districts could end their desegregation plans, it put the nail in integration’s coffin.

Today, the picture…

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